Casetext Brings AIDriven Brief Drafting to Employment Law

Librarian News Digest

Vol. 9, No. 185

Promise Kept

Casetext has been on a roll this year, developing new functionality and growing its customer base. Earlier in 2020, the company made headlines when it released a powerful, yet limited drafting tool for litigators. Bob Ambrogi broke the news back then and told us all that the company vowed to expand this functionality with new collections of motions. Well, the company is now making good on its word. Bob writes, “Today Casetext is introducing the first of those new collections – a set of 18 employment law briefs – 16 related to wage and hour cases in federal courts as well as under state law in California and New York, and two Title VII motions that are a preview of a forthcoming larger set of employment discrimination briefs.” It really looks promising. Let Bob take you on a tour in: Casetext Brings AI-Driven Brief Drafting to Employment Law.

Cursed with too much knowledge

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 184

It is fair to say that many folks in IT feel that more is better. With the DMS, we can collect every document every created. With the CRM, we can collect every contact every used. And so when they turn their attention on KM, more is better right? Consider these words from Nick Milton, “There are many cases where too much knowledge is counter-productive, especially where this knowledge is poor quality.” Be sure to read more at Knoco stories: Reasons why you should not incentivise knowledge publishing

Very real indeed

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 184

When I talk to many people about cyber security, they dismiss it all as “1s and 0s,” having little impact in the real work. Sadly it does indeed, have real-world consequences. In Germany, “A person in a life-threatening condition passed away after being forced to go to a more distant hospital due to a ransomware attack.” For this unfortunately soul, there was no extra life. If you know anyone who thinks it’s all just about “1s and 0s,” have them read more at BLEEPINGCOMPUTER: Ransomware attack at German hospital leads to death of patient

WeDiscovery

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 184

My early days in the world of litigation support providing me with all manner of insight and interesting stories. WeChat strikes me as interesting in many of the same ways. If you aren’t familiar with WeChat, it “is the most widely used communication and social media platform in China.” It has one billion active users and accounts for over one-third of all mobile data traffic in China. Sandeep Jadav describes the challenges of getting information from WeChat. If you have clients who do business in China, you need to read more at Legaltech news: WeChat E-discovery: Avoiding Pitfalls with a Critical Resource

Vendor News: Docket Navigator and Casetext

Librarian News Digest

Vol. 9, No. 184

Dewey B’s Vendor News

Jean O’Grady’s Dewey B. Strategic provides updates on the latest development for two ever evolving law technology provider, Casetext and Docket Navigator. O’Grady provides screenshots and a breakout of the latest developments. For Docket Navigator the focus is on firm win rates analytics. Casetext has released the first Compose employment law collection offering efficiency opportunities for the wage and hour space.

Exploring and Expanding PACER Access

Librarian News Digest

Vol. 9, No. 184

Freeing PACER Further

PACER and its associated fees continues to be spotlighted both in terms of making best use of the content for the public and taking a broadstroke approach to its associated fees. Today we highlight two stories, one discusses a new Congressional bill. The second dives a bit deeper into the capabilities of RSS feeds specifically for PACER content. The common theme of more access binds these two stories.

Just one simple question: Why?

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 183

It should not surprise anyone that anything can be “Internet-enabled.” Whether it should or not is a different story. This sentence pretty much sums it up what can be connected to your network, “A startling 44% reported seeing wearable medical devices; 43% said they had encountered kettles, coffee machines, and other connected kitchen appliances; 38% said the same of IP-enabled sports equipment, including skipping ropes and weights; 34% reported smart toys; and 27% said smart vehicles. Other responses included hand-wash devices, smart trash cans – and, in one case, aircraft engines.” If you own some of these wackier “smart” devices, please write and explain to me why in god’s name you do and what value you find in it. Read more at DARKReading: What’s on Your Enterprise Network? You Might be Surprised

Cracking the problem solving code

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 183

Charles Conn and Robert McLean write that “Great problem solvers are made, not born.” And towards that end, “Six mutually reinforcing approaches underly their success: (1) being ever-curious about every element of a problem; (2) being imperfectionists, with a high tolerance for ambiguity; (3) having a ‘dragonfly eye’ view of the world, to see through multiple lenses; (4) pursuing occurrent behavior and experimenting relentlessly; (5) tapping into the collective intelligence, acknowledging that the smartest people are not in the room; and (6) practicing ‘show and tell’ because storytelling begets action (exhibit).” This is a longer than average post, but well worth reading more at McKinsey and Company: Six problem-solving mindsets for very uncertain times

We don’t need cheerleaders

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 183

I find that as I get older, I find myself unable to continue to drink the Kool-Aid that so many organizations and groups put out. Lolly Daskal’s post on cheerleaders resonates with me. She writes, “We need leaders who are straight shooters, not sugar-coaters.” Amen. I believe in a glass half full approach but you aren’t doing anyone a favor with over the top positivity when there are significant issues. She also adds, “We need leaders who care less about being liked and more about being respected.” It’s hard to argue with these points. Be sure to read more at Lolly Daskal Blog: Why People Who Want Their Leader to Be a Cheerleader Are Getting It Wrong

What Blockchain and Artificial Intelligence Won’t Do for Corporate Lawyers

Librarian News Digest

Vol. 9, No. 183

Can’t Do It All

Blockchain and Artificial Intelligence, however, are more recent developments in the legal industry. It would not be unfair to say that we are still in that honeymoon phase with both and that there is a lot of hype regarding both. In many ways, we are still trying to find our footing with these innovations. One thing that is slowly becoming apparent, however, is that they cannot be everything to everyone. The question is what the truly practical and valuable applications will be. Jeffrey M. Lipshaw has some thoughts on just that. Don’t miss: What Blockchain and Artificial Intelligence Won’t Do for Corporate Lawyers.

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