Prepare for disappointment

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 156

If you thought the Federal Circuit Court of Appeals opinion on PACER was impactful, Robert Ambrogi is here to let some of the air out of your balloon. According to Bob, not much will happen, and certainly nothing permanent. Prepare for disappointment as you read more at Above the Law: Why The Federal Circuit’s PACER Ruling Is A Mixed Bag

American Legal Technology Awards

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 156

Created by Tom Martin (LawDroid), Patrick Palace (Palace Law), and Caitlin Moon (Program on Law and Innovation at Vanderbilt Law School), the new American Legal Technology Awards is designed to “honor companies and individuals who are making a difference in law through technology innovation.” It is not the traditional roster of names and companies, which I think is good. I’m curious to see who wins and exactly how “innovative” they are. Congratulations all. Read more at LawSites: 24 Finalists Named for Inaugural American Legal Technology Awards

You and your closest 19,999 friends

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 156

Now you and your closest 19,999 friends can videoconference together! “Users will now be able to scale meetings up to 20,000 participants, with a limit to 1,000 for interactive meetings, after which the call automatically shifts to a ‘view only’ mode.” Talk about video fatigue! Read more at Silicon UK: Microsoft Expands Teams Meetings To 20,000 People

Why The Federal Circuit’s PACER Ruling is a Mixed Bag

Librarian News Digest

Vol. 9, No. 157

PACER Ruling – Mixed Message?

Why the Federal Circuit’s PACER Ruling is a Mixed Bag provides a detailed discussion of the ruling last week from the Federal Circuit Court of Appeals related to PACER fees. Bob Ambrogi serves up some numbers that put the ruling into perspective and dashes the ideal that PACER will be free without an act of Congress. There is a lot to digest in this one so take the time to read it carefully if you have a vested interest in the ongoing saga related to PACER fees.

Wolters Kluwer Turbocharges SEC Filing Process with RBSource with RegReview

Librarian News Digest

Vol. 9, No. 157

Charging Up SEC Legal Tasks

Jean O’Grady brings us a look at how Wolters Kluwer Turbo-charges SEC Filing Process with RBSource with RegReview. The post details the components of the RB Source Filings and Reg Review and details the capabilities.

GDPR 2020: Where Compliance Lands Now

Librarian News Digest

Vol. 9, No. 157

Evaluating GDPR Progress

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is two years old. With the recent anniversary, the European Commission has issued the first evaluation report. Kelly LeBlanc’s GDPR 2020: Where Compliance Lands Now details the evaluation report and other components of the two year review including an overview of litigation and fines and a look ahead.

BOL:

Legal Administrator Daily

Vol. 9, No. 158

Android: Love it/Hate it

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 155

It’s stories like this that make me wonder whether I should ban Android phones from our environment. Let’s start with the numbers: 400+ and 1,000,000,000. It seems that “A billion or more Android devices are vulnerable to hacks that can turn them into spying tools by exploiting more than 400 vulnerabilities in Qualcomm’s Snapdragon chip, researchers reported this week.” The good news is “Qualcomm has released a fix for the flaws…” and the bad news is “but so far it hasn’t been incorporated into the Android OS or any Android device that uses Snapdragon.” Read more at:
ars technica: Snapdragon chip flaws put >1 billion Android phones at risk of data theft
DARKReading: 400+ Qualcomm Chip Vulnerabilities Threaten Millions of Android Phones

You can’t please everyone

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 155

Rick Georges writes about stoicism a fair amount. In that vein, I’m not sure how he found this 1997 video clip of Steve Jobs at the Worldwide Developer Conference, but it’s a great one. Listen to Jobs explain to an upset attendee why you can’t please all of the people all the time. And why starting with the user experience trumps starting with technology. Words to live by. Watch more at FUTURE LAWYER: Stoic Response Of The Day – Steve Jobs On Why You Can’t Please Everybody

Home Office Ergonomics

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 155

I thought I had done a great job picking out a desk chair almost four years ago when I first setup my home office. And for the amount of time I used it back then, it was a good chair. Now with as much use as it gets, I’m thinking, I made at best, I made an ok-good choice. But with the new house came a new office, new furniture and lighting. Out went the books as monitor stands and in came a sleek new monitors and laptop arm. Not a lot of people had the time or luxury to think about their home offices, “good enough” was the standard. Sean Gallagher has a thoughtful post on things to consider in your office to move it to the next level of “good enough.” Read more at ars technica: Lawn chairs and kitchen tables: Ergonomics in the involuntary work-from-home era

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