Inadequate shielding

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 188

If you work with litigations in the European Union, then you should know a bit about Schrems II. “The notable Schrems II battle came to a conclusion in July and dealt a significant blow to corporate collection of EU citizens’ data when the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) deemed the Privacy Shield an inadequate measure for protecting EU citizens’ data from disproportional access from U.S. law enforcement.” Read more at Legaltech news: Judge Panel: ‘Schrems II’ Could Impact US Discovery Matters, Upcoming Brexit

Zero, Null, Nought

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 188

There are lots of posts about the Zerologon vulnerability in Windows Server. I thought this one explained it best. Get patching! Read more at CSO: Zerologon explained: Why you should patch this critical Windows Server flaw now

Band together to get what you need

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 188

You’ll get no argument from me. Corporate security and compliance needs, while similar in some ways to that of a private law firm, are different enough that they do need there own systems. But I want to twist this a bit and say that in order to ensure those needs are met, corporations need to band together. Group advocacy will be the thing that will best bring about a new generation of corporate-specific compliance and security tools. Meet with your peers through ILTA or ACC. AT one point I might also suggested CLOC, but they seem to have retreated from the security space. Read more at Legaltech news: General Counsel’s Needs May Be Driving the Future of Cybersecurity Solutions

Who Teaches Tech? (Spoiler: Librarians!)

Librarian News Digest

Vol. 9, No. 188

We Got It Covered

We do have a very interesting highlight for your Wednesday reading pleasure. It comes from the RIPS Law Librarian Blog and Ashley Matthews. She observes that technology, already a big part of what we do as librarians, has become even more proliferous in these days of working remotely. This ups the ante on students, practitioners, and even the public to have a better sense of what they are doing. She asks, “how can law librarians formalize the ways in which we teach and encourage technological competence, especially when it’s not universally considered a ‘substantive’ skill? ” It is indeed a timely and important question. Read her thoughts and weigh in with your own at: Who Teaches Tech? (Spoiler: Librarians!).

Not sure…

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 187

As I was reading about Portwell’s motherboard with twenty, yes 20, USB ports, I was thinking wow, that’s insane. Then I counted up the number of USB devices I have attached to my home computer. Ok, so maybe it’s not so insane. Then the post about an old style, CRT (cathode ray tube) TV killing internet connectivity for everyone in the village of Aberhosan, Wales made me think back to my consulting days and a client’s issue with computer rebooting being traced to the elevator hitting the top floor. Think of the cost of those techs, of replacing those copper cables, when the real solution would have been a $100 flat screen TV. Another gem, I almost missed, is in the comments. “You can tell this is not a US story because the ISP is frustrated that their customers are getting poor service.” Ha! Read more at ars technica:
New Xeon-capable motherboard offers 20 USB 3.2 ports
Old TV set interfered with village’s DSL Internet each day for 18 months

Blah Blah Blah

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 187

As I read Mark Cohen’s piece this morning on COVID-19’s transformation of law, I am vacillating between “blah blah law change blah blah,” and “maybe this is the actual tipping point?” Changes in the client landscape, accelerated client transformation, blah blah blah. I’m not sure there is anything on this list that hasn’t been said in one way or another for the last twenty years. And for the past twenty years law, as an industry, as pretty much remained unchanged. Heck, we can’t even get rid of the billable hour. I’m sure the questions Mark proposes have been asked numerous times over the past two decades. “This Is Just The Beginning Of Law’s Transformation.” There have been so many events in the past that claim to be the tipping point for major change in law. It’s been more wishful thinking than actual change. I agree that COVID is forcing the hand of many businesses in forcing greater digital transformation. But will it be able to peirce the bubble that surrounds law and actually be the tipping point? I agree COVID Is making us do some things differently: work from home and online courts are two big examples. But will that be the stuff that transforms the legal function and creates the new models that “will drive education/training, delivery, and dispute resolution?” To suggest that Utah and Arizona regulatory reforms are caused by COVID-related change would require the Bars to work at a speed that boggles the mind. I remain wishful, but not convinced, that COVID-19 is the tipping point. Which team are you on: Team Blah Blah or Team Tipping Point? Read more at Legal Mosaic: Covid-19 Is Transforming The Legal Industry: Macro And Micro Evidence

Lawyers and judges rushing in?

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 187

Doug Austin talks about search terms, TAR, and judges vs experts deciding on parties’ search term disputes. I would argue that the ultimate conclusions from this post are that one size does not fit all and when in doubt, go to the experts. Read more at eDiscovery Today: If “Angels Fear to Tread” into Search Terms, Why Are Lawyers So Confident About Them?: eDiscovery Best Practices

Spiral of silence

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 186

This post really resonated with me in two major ways: my work life and my association life. Shane Parrish writes, “Our desire to fit in with others means we don’t always say what we think. We only express opinions that seem safe.” One of my great manager moments has always been when I can get someone new to take a stance opposite mine or disagree with me. It indeed means that they do feel comfortable and secure in their role. The second has been when a small faction inside an organization rise to power and create an environment where free opinions cannot be expressed. The first you want to achieve and the second you want to prevent or break when you find it. Find out how the spiral of silence works and how to discover what people really think by reading more at Farnam Street: The Spiral of Silence

Going private

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 186

The list starts off with my favorite, DuckDuckGo, and ends with Firefox Focus. It includes Startpage, which doesn’t use its own index, but rather “allows users to obtain Google Search results while protecting their data.” That can be a major plus, because often the other privacy indexes are not as complete as the major players. To see more privacy browsers, read more at BLEEPINGCOMPUTER: Guard your data with these privacy-focused search engines and browsers

When will it end?

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 186

The collection of five authors (Sarun Charumilind, Matt Craven, Jessica Lamb, Adam Sabow, and Matt Wilson) attempt to answer the question we all want answered. They first break it down into two parts, the epidemiological end point and the end of the social and economic upheaval we live. They write, “The two ends are related, of course, but not linearly. At the latest, the transition to normal will come when herd immunity is reached. But in regions with strong public-health responses, normalcy can likely come significantly before the epidemiological end of the pandemic.” Make some time to read more at McKinsey and Company Blog: When will the COVID-19 pandemic end?

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