Category Archives: Law Technology News - Page 2

Data 101

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 18, No. 449

Have you ever considered the ideas of open and public data? Semantics? Subtle nuances? Different? Lewis Wynne-Jones goes into detail about the BIG differences between open data and public data. Lewis concludes, “In order for open data to be as effective as predicted, the line that demarcates open and public data needs to be erased, and governments need to start making a lot more of their public information open data. After all, we’re the ones paying for it.” Read more at Data Science Central: Is There a Difference Between Open Data and Public Data?

Feel better now?

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 18, No. 448

Since October is National Cybersecurity Awareness Month, I’m going to try to highlight a security post every day. We will ease into this with a “feel good” post. “38% of the Fortune 500 do not have a CISO.” If those huge companies can’t do it, how can you? Feel better, but keep in mind you STILL have to protect your organization. Read more at HELPNETSECURITY: 38% of the Fortune 500 do not have a CISO

It’s all about priorities

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 18, No. 448

Lawyers are notorious for “not having time” to do things they don’t want to. So I think we can all relate to Nick Milton’s post today. Of course lawyers have limited time. We all do. We get 24 hours each day and that’s it. It is all in the prioritization of what we choose to do. Anyone who is too busy to do something, that “something” isn’t viewed as valuable or worthwhile to them. Nick states it plainly, “If you meet this rebuttal, you need to work on making KM a priority.” Read more at Knoco stories: What it really means when people say “I don’t have time for KM”

Practice dialing it down

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 18, No. 448

Some people snicker when you tell them that lawyers “practice” law. The retort, might be something like, “Haven’t they gotten it right yet?” But as Mark Cohen explains, “The distinction between practicing law and engaging in the delivery of legal services-the business of law-is critically important.” Now I’m a bit too jaded, expected too many things to make bigger impacts in legal then they have to agree with Mark that legal is “undergoing a tectonic shift.” (Emphasis added). Or that it is even “morphing.” Law is changing – around the edged, in select firms and at the top. So as you read this post, dial it down from 11 to maybe 7 and you’ll be good. Read more at Legal Mosaic: What’s A Lawyer Now? Law’s Shift From Practice To Skill

Survey says what!?

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 18, No. 447

The 2019 LexisNexis CounselLink Enterprise Legal Management Trend Report is out and according to its author, Kris Satkunas, it does not bode well for mid-sized firms. The big issues are:

* Use of alternative fee arrangements (AFA) increased from less than 10% of matters to 12.2% last year. This is supposed to lead to more and more AFAs where only the big firms can afford to create ancillary alternate legal service provider subsidiaries. Perhaps, but I’m not sure mid-sized firms clients are demanding the same level of AFAs.
* When it comes to median hourly rates, larger firms average rates of over 50%. This is up from 45% last year. The author says “The bigger firms, because of the increased volume at the high end, can now double down on being more efficient at the low end and offer to do more commodity type work.” Their overhead is higher then smaller firms, so I’m not sure this automatically follows.

The short of it is, I’m not so sure about these trends. I’ve given up my email address to get a copy of the report to read it for myself. Read more at TechLaw Crossroads: CounselLink Findings May Spell Trouble for Mid-Size Firms

Where dragon fire and penguin tears meets neural networks

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 18, No. 447

Bill Schmarzo hooked me his title mainly because I spent all of last week in my London hotel room wrestling with the hot and cold water feeds trying to shower without burning or freezing myself. Seems I’m not the only one either (From this post, Expat Gone Foreign had the same experience!). If you have any interest in neural networks, be sure to take some time and read more at Data Science Central: Using a Bathroom Faucet to Teach Neural Network Basic Concepts

Quantum computing: WHEN?

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 18, No. 447

Quantum computing is a clear threat to the very foundation of our electronic security. If you don’t believe me, you can trust The National Academy of Science’s Committee on Technical Assessment of the Feasibility and Implications of Quantum Computing. So when will quantum computing be able to break and destroy security as we know it today? Despite all the brain power working on the issue, noone knows yet. The best guess is (more or less) ten years. So if its so far out, why worry? Tim Hollebeek puts it well, “Whether cryptographically relevant quantum computers emerge five, 10, or 15 years from now is almost beside the point. Bottom line, we need to start preparing now. Judging from past cryptographic evolutions (such as the shift from RSA 1024 to RSA 2048, or from SHA-1 to SHA-256), these transitions can take years, even decades.” Be sure to read more at HELPNETSECURITY: How long before quantum computers break encryption?

Avoiding fatigue

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 18, No. 425

The more you log, the more you have to review. It’s a vicious circle. Anthony Diaz says “Traditional, non-integrated SOCs are not designed to address the dynamic nature of today’s businesses, the accelerating volume of alerts per hour, or the thousands of raw events per second coming from monitoring and detection products.” He offers up some solid tips on how to avoid fatigue in reviewing those logs. Read more at DARKReading: How Do I Handle Security Alert Fatigue?

Metrics, metrics and more metrics

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 18, No. 441

First off I hate this style of article where it takes you 21 clocks to read the whole thing. But Ericka Chickowski’s feedback from a number of security experts is worth the extra clicks. Read more at DARKReading: The 20 Worst Metrics in Cybersecurity

Go to jail

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 18, No. 441

Pen testers are supposed to be the good guys, right? But two good guys from security firm Coalfire got jailed after doing their job for an Iowa court! The good news (or bad news depending on yur viewpoint) is that they were caught doing a physical penetration test with lock picks inside the Dallas County courthouse by Dallas County Sheriff’s Department officers. The article suggests that a possible turf war between the state and county officials as part of the issue, which, if true, would be a shame. Read more at ars technica: Iowa officials claim confusion over scope led to arrest of pen-testers

Social Media Auto Publish Powered By : XYZScripts.com