Category Archives: Law Technology News - Page 2

Friday Fun and Cuteness

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 209

Because, Baby Yoda. Read more at Exterro’s E-Discovery and Privacy Breakdown: Friday Funnies: Exterro’s Meme Series – Baby Data Privacy Law Edition

It doesn’t have to be "big" AI

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 209

This post points out what I think is the biggest issue with AI adoption – the “big” AI. Most people immediately think they must have some hugely complex issue or problem in order to get involved with AI. But there are “little” AIs too. Evan Morris writes about using artificial intelligence for improving support availability and accelerating administrative tasks (among others) Get your mind off “big” AI and think about “little” AI and read more at Data Science Central: How Artificial Intelligence Is Reshaping Small Businesses

Books: still fruity in biglaw

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 208

Our physical library has diminished to the point that reading the first part of this post actually surprised me. “In law firms’ ‘new normal,’ lawyers may have to quarantine books for 72 hours before they’re placed back into rotation.” I understand the precautions, but wouldn’t have expected it to be such a huge deal in 2020. “Ending print subscriptions is ‘low-hanging fruit'” was low hanging fruit a decade ago. With the pandemic, I would think it should be more like shoveling the rotten fruit off the ground. Read more at Legaltech news: Pandemic Reality: Law Librarians Grapple With 24/7 Availability, Accelerated Digital Transition

Translation? A patching we will go!

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 208

“Cisco has stomped out a slew of high-severity vulnerabilities across its lineup of network-security products. The most severe flaws can be exploited by an unauthenticated, remote attacker to launch a passel of malicious attacks – from denial of service (DoS) to cross-site request forgery (CSRF).” Translation? A patching we will go! Read more at threat post: Cisco Warns of Severe DoS Flaws in Network Security Software

Take a deep dive

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 208

Anurag Malik, Chief Technology Officer at ContractPodAi, paints a great visual on contracts, “Viewing your company’s agreement-related data – without the benefit of a contract analysis solution – is like looking at the surface of the ocean to try to understand what is deep under the water. You can see what is happening ‘above the water,’ of course, yet miss out on the ecosystems of information and insights lying beneath the surface.” He lays out five goals for a contract analysis tool: 1) Understanding Historical Trends; 2) Completing Data Migration; 3) Increasing Renewal and Win-Back Rates; 4) Becoming Device Agnostic and Offering Secure, Reliable Cloud Services; and 5) Easing Customization. Read more at Artificial Lawyer: 5 Ways Contract Analytics Can Reduce Risk + Increase Efficiency

Ten years!? Try three.

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 207

This post is an apt one as many of us are in, or beginning our budget cycles for 2021. None of us could have foreseen and properly prepared for 2020 and we’re honestly still making some guesses as to what 2021 will look like. I have to say the title and thrust of his post irked me. First of all, the question, “Where will your law firm be in ten years?” is a very aged concept. Can you honestly answer that? Back in the 80s and 90s we were coming off ten year plans in favor of a shorter, more practical five year plans. Today, three years is more common. And given the further acceleration of technology, even that can be difficult. Second of all, I’m a big believer in “People, Process and Technology,” which means technology is the last of the things you think about. I get the Wolters Kluwer’s “The Future Ready Lawyer” report and the grouping of firms into Leading, Transitioning and Trailing buckets, but let’s be realistic. “Where will your law firm be in three years?” Read more at Law Technology Today: Law firms still aren’t budgeting for technology

KM xfer without baggage

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 207

Nick Milton does his best to remove the baggage and assumptions that come with our usage of the phrase, “Knowledge transfer.” His Boston Squares diagram of Ask, Tell, Search and Share help answer the questions of “What exactly do we MEAN by transferring knowledge? How is it transferred, and what prompts the transfer?” Be sure to read more at Knoco stories: 4 dimensions for knowledge transfer

Beyond Attorney Assholery

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 207

Ruth Carter writes her post from the lawyer to lawyer framework, but frankly I see key concepts that help me as CIO to lawyer and CIO to anyone. Afterall, it has been my experience that assholery is not limited to just those with JDs. Ruth concludes with a sentiment that I think we can all agree to, “In a perfect world, asshole tactics and behaviors would be discouraged in law school as well as in law firms and all places of employment.” Read more at attorney at work: Advocacy Without Assholery

Have you seen these men?

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 206

“Six men accused of carrying out some of the world’s most destructive hacks-including the NotPetya disk wiper and power grid attacks that knocked out electricity for hundreds of thousands of Ukrainians-have been indicted in US federal court.” Hacking used to be used to describe bored computer geniuses looking for the ultimate challenge of bypassing computer security. These six are at an entirely different level. Read more at ars technica: Six Russians accused of the world’s most destructive hacks indicted

Big or small, all should have MDM

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 206

In his post this morning, Jeff Richardson goes over the 2020 ABA Legal Technology Resource Center survey. There is some good information on iPhone and iPad usage in the courtroom. But what caught my attention is the data on mobile device management. “According to the survey, only 33% of all lawyers say that they can access their law firm’s network without any restriction. That number rises to around 40% for smaller law firms, falls to 28% for law firms with 100-499 attorneys, and falls to about 14% for lawyers at law firms of 500 lawyers or more.” The numbers struck me as very high, so I pulled out the ILTA Tech survey to compare. At the smaller end that survey says 57% have no MDM and at the high end only 5% do not. Different participants, different categorization buckets and more should show some variance, but not that much. Regardless of firm size, an MDM should be in place. Read more at iPhone J.D.: 2020 ABA Tech Survey provides information on attorney use of iPhones and iPads

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