Category Archives: Law Technology News

Back to the 90s?

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 217

With the news that Deloitte has bought UK-based law firm, Kemp Little, Richard Tromans wonders if we’ve time warped back to the 1990s? Richard lays out three possible scenarios and writes, “Right now there is just one acquisition of one mid-size UK law firm… but, the thought of what this move might become and snowball into is tantalising to say the least.” Be tantalized and read more at Artificial Lawyer: 1990s Once Again? The Deloitte Law Firm MA Deal

Pay me now or PAY me more later?

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 217

For home computers I sorta get it. For enterprise organizations, I do not. A friend of my wife’s family runs a big mortgage company and was quite pleased with the fact that he hadn’t spent money on upgrading their computer systems. He’s not alone. “According to NetMarketShare, Windows 7 saw a drop from 22.77% to 20.41% last month. The report shows that 20.41% of desktops still use Windows 7. Even worse, some are still using Windows XP, according to the report.” Good luck people. Something tells me you’re going to end up spending a lot more then it would have cost to do a timely upgrade. Read more at BLEEPING COMPUTER: Windows 7 won’t die, still second most popular operating system

What would you buy?

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 217

It’s not every day that an account goes from $957,000,000 to $1.38. But one bitcoin wallet (1HQ3Go3ggs8pFnXuHVHRytPCq5fGG8Hbhx to be precise) did just that. “Was it the owner themselves, or did someone crack this wallet?” is the question people are asking. As I wait for the election results, I find myself thinking what I would do if I cashed out $1 billion in cryptocurrency. What would you spend it on? Hmmmm the possibilities are nearly endless! Read more at BLEEPING COMPUTER: Someone just emptied out a $1 billion BitCoin wallet

Public Enemy Number One

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 216

Microsoft, Carnegie Mellon University’s Software Engineering Institute, MITRE, Bosch, IBM, NVIDIA, Airbus, Deep Instinct, Two Six Labs, the University of Toronto, Cardiff University, PricewaterhouseCoopers, and Berryville Institute of Machine Learning are an interesting grouping of organizations. What they have produced is even more interesting: “a dictionary of techniques used to attack ML models.” The threats to machine learning and artificial intelligence are very real. But Charles Clancy put it in perspective, “There’s a truism in the power industry that the most dangerous adversaries to our electric grid are – squirrels. Keep that in mind – there are risks to AI, but it’s also extremely valuable.” But as ML and AI get more common, those squirrels may drop in the rankings. Read more at DARKReading: Microsoft and Others Catalog Threats to Machine Learning Systems

To err is human but to really foul things up requires a computer

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 216

As I mentioned to Victoria Hudgins, computer outages are a fact of life. Everyone experiences them. How you handle them and communicate to your customers is key. Are you doing what you must to be forgiven? Be sure to read more at Legaltech news: Legal Tech Clients Know Software Outages Happen, but Don’t Make It a Habit

The dangerous world of a man (person) who does not exist

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 216

Reading this post had me doing a major flashback to the opening of the TV series Knight Rider and the phrase, “A shadowy flight into the dangerous world of a man who does not exist.” I’ve always thought that these new AI-generated people could be the end of the entertainment industry as we know it. As Kurt Cagle writes, “The models don’t age out of roles, don’t have bad hair days, or become prima donnas.” Will we end up with AI generated lawyers making virtual court appearances? Or… has it already happened!? Read more at Data Science Central: AI Generated Avatars Becoming Digital Influencers

Input is easier than output

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 215

You may read Nick Milton’s headline and shake your head in confusion, but he is spot on. Ask anyone who’s designed a document management system. The simpler and less work on the front end means a huge increase of work on the back-end. So what happens when things are too easy? According to Nick, “People fill in the form, they put in the bare minimum, they don’t give any context, they don’t tell the story, they don’t explain the lesson. And as a result, almost none of these lessons are re-used.” Read more at Knoco stories: When “easier to share” means “harder to learn”

Learn your lessons well

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 215

With the technology environment today being more “when” and “how fast” than if,” Bhatnagar, Will Forrest, Naufal Khan, and Abdallah Salami provide four great lessons in understanding the differences. They are, “Sourcing and managing consumption of cloud is a dynamic exercise, Cloud economics is a demand rather than a supply game, Granular visibility and forecasting are needed to optimize consumption of cloud, and Cross-functional FinOps is essential to manage cloud sourcing and consumption.” Understanding those lessons can mean the difference between success and failure. Read more at McKinsey Digital: Unlocking value: Four lessons in cloud sourcing and consumption

It’s never that simple

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 215

I was doubtful about any single factor being the decider of the success or failure of a law firm, so I jumped to the end of Karl Harris’ comments. Spoiler alert, but he says, “Law firm leaders need to make sure they’ve got that customer-centric product management approach.” With the idea that this concept drives everything from hiring to policy to technology and more, I guess I can buy into that. But it’s never that simple, is it? Read more at Above the Law: This One Factor Will Determine Winners And Losers In The New Legal World

Acts of war

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 214

A scary sentence: “The indictment of six members of the Russian military for the NotPetya ransomware attack places companies on notice that insurance ‘is not a get-out-of-jail-free card.'” You’d better go check your cyberinsurance policy. Read more at DARKReading: ‘Act of War’ Clause Could Nix Cyber Insurance Payouts

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