Author Archives: Rees Morrison

Contracts are moving from being documents to being data.

#contracts #data

 ‘The traditional view of contracts as ‘documents’ is fast giving way to an appreciation that they are in fact a critical source of ‘data’, at both [the] transactional and portfolio level[s].’ This quote makes sense. If you have enough contracts and you extract meta-data about them and interpretative data from within them (such as how many have penalty clauses), the contracts take on a second form: sources of numbers. Click here for the full text from the IACCM.

Leading Law Departments Vol. 1, No. 43

An admirable announcement of no correlation found in litigation data.

#litigation #correlation

This article deserves praise. It is a commendable effort to look at litigation filings and subsequent litigation hours billed by law firms, even if no conclusions or correlations could be reached. At least the researcher gathered data, explored a reasonable hypothesis, and wrote about the non-results clearly. Click here for the piece by Becky Stander.

Leading Law Departments Vol. 1, No. 43

Is the core of legal advice numbers?

#data

Is the core of legal advice numbers? Scratch your head a moment about this claim in a longer piece. ‘The backbone of all legal matters centers around data.’ I don’t agree. A legal matter consists of a set of facts — certainly unique, often incomplete, and usually contested — and the complex, interpreted inter-play with those facts of a range of possible laws, statutes, regulations, rights and responsibilities. That volatile mixture does not yield to a machine learning algorithm. Or, maybe, the quote uses the word “data” to mean “information”. But that warps the numeric core meaning of “data” and states a silly and obvious truth. “The backbone of all legal matters centers around facts and information.” Vendors to the legal industry these days are resting too heavily on what computers can calculate. Click here for the full text from Exterro.

Leading Law Departments  Vol. 1, No. 43

Four inhouse veterans on ediscovery.

Leading Law Departments

Vol. 1, No. 38

Four in-house veterans on e-discovery. It is unusual for a webinar to have in-house professionals speaking about e-discovery so I am mentioning this free webinar. On it, they will address such topics as ‘technology triage, data mapping and defensible deletion, building your response playbook, or bringing technology in-house.’ Click here for the full text from Zapproved.

You’re more creative when you set aside uncontrollable.

Leading Law Departments

Vol. 1, No. 38

You’re more creative when you set aside uncontrollable. In-house counsel have many opportunities to innovate, but they may be blocked by mental disrupters. ‘The problem of innovation is also rooted in the mind itself. Our ordinary mental habits, after all, leave little room for big ideas and innovative insights. Most of us go through our day lost in worries and irritation. Our ability to think creatively is often hijacked by unproductive obsessions. We worry about what others think of us. We fixate on that deal that is about to close. We can’t stop thinking about recent drama with our co-workers.’ Click here for the full text from Nate Klemp.

What does ‘Contract Lifecycle Management’ really mean?

Leading Law Departments

Vol. 1, No. 38

What does ‘Contract Lifecycle Management’ really mean? I am no expert, but this summary from a vendor’s announcement seems apt: ‘The solution from Contract Logix will enable them to securely centralize their contracts and related data in single contract repository and more efficiently request, create, negotiate, execute, and manage agreements.’ What law department wouldn’t wish for that? Click here for the full text from Contract Logix.

Worldwide eDiscovery SaaS Review

Leading Law Departments

Vol. 1, No. 38

‘IDC MarketScape: Worldwide eDiscovery SaaS Review Software 2019 Vendor Assessment,’ could be informative if you are considering eDiscovery solutions. Click here for the full text from Exterro.

Guidance on upgrading your legal ops software.

Leading Law Departments

Vol. 1, No. 38

Guidance on upgrading your legal ops software. Note the ease with which in-the-cloud software can be enhanced, as compared to the old days where upgrades had to be sent to each user. ‘Software-as-a-Service solutions have made the process of updating a product, where bug fixes and small improvements are done, an automatic function. A software upgrade is a complete product makeover, stepping up from one version to the next, and is more likely to require user permission and attention.’ The image summarizes some pros and cons of upgrading. Click here for the full text from Mitratech.

Metrics on management from smaller law departments.

Leading Law Departments

Vol. 1, No. 38

Metrics on management from smaller law departments. Always interested in data, I offer this recent report of ‘views and metrics based on 176 legal departments.’ Click here for the full report from Wolters Kluwer.

NLP and contract improvements.

Leading Law Departments

Vol. 1, No. 38

NLP and contract improvements. Here is an educational article about Natural Language Processing (NLP) in the contracts arena. ‘He estimates that Fortune Global 2000 and Fortune 1000 companies spend about $35 billion annually to review and negotiate contracts – most of that in salaries to lawyers.’ Click here for the full text about BlackBoiler.

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