Author Archives: Jeffrey Brandt - Page 2

Going private

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 186

The list starts off with my favorite, DuckDuckGo, and ends with Firefox Focus. It includes Startpage, which doesn’t use its own index, but rather “allows users to obtain Google Search results while protecting their data.” That can be a major plus, because often the other privacy indexes are not as complete as the major players. To see more privacy browsers, read more at BLEEPINGCOMPUTER: Guard your data with these privacy-focused search engines and browsers

Spiral of silence

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 186

This post really resonated with me in two major ways: my work life and my association life. Shane Parrish writes, “Our desire to fit in with others means we don’t always say what we think. We only express opinions that seem safe.” One of my great manager moments has always been when I can get someone new to take a stance opposite mine or disagree with me. It indeed means that they do feel comfortable and secure in their role. The second has been when a small faction inside an organization rise to power and create an environment where free opinions cannot be expressed. The first you want to achieve and the second you want to prevent or break when you find it. Find out how the spiral of silence works and how to discover what people really think by reading more at Farnam Street: The Spiral of Silence

When will it end?

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 186

The collection of five authors (Sarun Charumilind, Matt Craven, Jessica Lamb, Adam Sabow, and Matt Wilson) attempt to answer the question we all want answered. They first break it down into two parts, the epidemiological end point and the end of the social and economic upheaval we live. They write, “The two ends are related, of course, but not linearly. At the latest, the transition to normal will come when herd immunity is reached. But in regions with strong public-health responses, normalcy can likely come significantly before the epidemiological end of the pandemic.” Make some time to read more at McKinsey and Company Blog: When will the COVID-19 pandemic end?

You’re being manipulated

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 185

Diego Lopez Yse starts out his post with these heavy duty questions, “Do you think your actions are the result of your own free choices? What if those actions are the inevitable and necessary consequence of antecedent states of affairs? What does this mean for your free will?” To find out more about the hows and whys, you need to read more at Data Science Central: The illusion of choice

Bad air

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 185

If you live outside North America then this post might not be as interesting to you. The quick answer to one of the title questions is: particulate matter, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, benzene, and formaldehyde (to name a few). Smoke from the wild fires burning across California, Oregon, and Washington has crossed the country, fouling the skies above the East Coast. It changes as it moves, making the health care issues different. “In other words, what you breathe in, and how hazardous it remains, may depend on how far you live from the Pacific coast.” Read more at ars technica: What’s in wildfire smoke, and how dangerous is it?

Inclusive means EVERYBODY not just half

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 185

Jennifer Johnson raises a great point. How diverse and inclusive is your firm if you’re just focused on half of it? She writes, “This is no small issue. Among larger firms, it is quite common for so-called ‘nonlawyers’ to comprise as much as 50% of total head count. These business services professionals-members of legal operations, human resources, finance, information technology, marketing and administration functions-are critical to a law firm’s success, but far too often are not treated as valuable members of the larger team.” Make sure your efforts include everyone. Read more at Legaltech news: Inclusion in Law Firms Should Be About Everyone-Not Just Lawyers

Very real indeed

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 184

When I talk to many people about cyber security, they dismiss it all as “1s and 0s,” having little impact in the real work. Sadly it does indeed, have real-world consequences. In Germany, “A person in a life-threatening condition passed away after being forced to go to a more distant hospital due to a ransomware attack.” For this unfortunately soul, there was no extra life. If you know anyone who thinks it’s all just about “1s and 0s,” have them read more at BLEEPINGCOMPUTER: Ransomware attack at German hospital leads to death of patient

Cursed with too much knowledge

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 184

It is fair to say that many folks in IT feel that more is better. With the DMS, we can collect every document every created. With the CRM, we can collect every contact every used. And so when they turn their attention on KM, more is better right? Consider these words from Nick Milton, “There are many cases where too much knowledge is counter-productive, especially where this knowledge is poor quality.” Be sure to read more at Knoco stories: Reasons why you should not incentivise knowledge publishing

WeDiscovery

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 184

My early days in the world of litigation support providing me with all manner of insight and interesting stories. WeChat strikes me as interesting in many of the same ways. If you aren’t familiar with WeChat, it “is the most widely used communication and social media platform in China.” It has one billion active users and accounts for over one-third of all mobile data traffic in China. Sandeep Jadav describes the challenges of getting information from WeChat. If you have clients who do business in China, you need to read more at Legaltech news: WeChat E-discovery: Avoiding Pitfalls with a Critical Resource

Just one simple question: Why?

Law Technology Daily Digest

Vol. 20, No. 183

It should not surprise anyone that anything can be “Internet-enabled.” Whether it should or not is a different story. This sentence pretty much sums it up what can be connected to your network, “A startling 44% reported seeing wearable medical devices; 43% said they had encountered kettles, coffee machines, and other connected kitchen appliances; 38% said the same of IP-enabled sports equipment, including skipping ropes and weights; 34% reported smart toys; and 27% said smart vehicles. Other responses included hand-wash devices, smart trash cans – and, in one case, aircraft engines.” If you own some of these wackier “smart” devices, please write and explain to me why in god’s name you do and what value you find in it. Read more at DARKReading: What’s on Your Enterprise Network? You Might be Surprised

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